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A Mail on Sunday article dated 9/1/1994 under the heading

Father to sue top law officer.

The Government's top lawyer is facing a new threat of legal action.
A father of two is considering suing Official Solicitor Peter Harris for refusing to release cash for two girls' school fees due tomorrow.
And the father will defy Mr Harris's instructions that the girls should, instead, immediately start going to a State school.
The row comes just three weeks after The Mail on Sunday revealed a 12-year-old boy's intention to sue Mr Harris for failing to follow his wishes in a custody case.
Both cases will put the Children Act - designed to protect youngsters' wishes - under fresh scrutiny.
In this latest case the Official Solicitor was made sole trustee of 25,000 left to the girls by their grandmother after an acrimonious and lengthy custody battle, which their father won. It was agreed that the money should be spent on the girls' schooling until they were 16.
On two occasions courts have upheld this arrangement and the girls' move to a 1,200-a-year Roman Catholic preparatory school in Sussex last year was approved by a judge and a barrister acting for the Official Solicitor.
But now Mr Harris has told the father that the girls, now aged 11 and 12, must be moved to State schools - because he wants money to be left over for them when they leave school or go to university.
Last night the father - who lives in Hampshire - said that tomorrow he will drive his daughters to their day school for the start of the new term - even though Mr Harris's office has said that no further funds will be made available.
He is now in discussion with lawyers over High Court action to remove the Official Solicitor as trustee of the cash. Last night he said: 'Everybody was happy - the judge, me, the girls. The only person who was not happy was the Official Solicitor.
'He sent a letter out of the blue saying that from Monday the girls had to go to local State schools so that there was enough money for them to go to university.
'He would make no more money available for fees at the school which the girls had chosen and are very happy at.'
But he said that the girls considered their education for the next six years to be of primary importance.
Decisions about going to university were still a long way off.
The Official Solicitor was criticised by the 12-year-old boy in the previous case for failing to follow his wishes to let him live with his father after his parents split up.
He consulted lawyers before Christmas. If the action goes ahead he will make legal history as the first child to take action against the Official Solicitor.


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